The students were presented with non-representational artwork and asked to read gender and sexuality into the work. This allowed the students to explore gender and sexuality outside of recognisable images and depictions. From here, students brought in objects that they associated certain genders/sexualities with, and produced shadow drawings from the objects to create ambiguous forms. These forms then laid the foundation of their sculptural work.

The students were presented with non-representational artwork and asked to read gender and sexuality into the work. This allowed the students to explore gender and sexuality outside of recognisable images and depictions. From here, students brought in objects that they associated certain genders/sexualities with, and produced shadow drawings from the objects to create ambiguous forms. These forms then laid the foundation of their sculptural work.

 This student wanted to experiment with space, creating a large sculpture that extended beyond the confines of the classroom. Here, we are asked to read a queer space in the school.

This student wanted to experiment with space, creating a large sculpture that extended beyond the confines of the classroom. Here, we are asked to read a queer space in the school.

hangingb.jpg
Closeup.jpg
 The students were presented with non-representational artwork and asked to read gender and sexuality into the work. This allowed the students to explore gender and sexuality outside of recognisable images and depictions. From here, students brought in objects that they associated to certain genders/sexualities, and produced shadow drawings from the objects to create ambiguous forms. These forms then laid the foundation of their sculptural work.

The students were presented with non-representational artwork and asked to read gender and sexuality into the work. This allowed the students to explore gender and sexuality outside of recognisable images and depictions. From here, students brought in objects that they associated to certain genders/sexualities, and produced shadow drawings from the objects to create ambiguous forms. These forms then laid the foundation of their sculptural work.

gallery.jpg
 This student wanted to experiment with space, creating a large sculpture that extended beyond the confines of the classroom. Here, we are asked to read a queer space in the school.

This student wanted to experiment with space, creating a large sculpture that extended beyond the confines of the classroom. Here, we are asked to read a queer space in the school.

 This student researched Lucy Orta’s work. Orta blurs boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture, creating ambiguous forms. This student has created a table dress that we cannot easily categorise as one thing or another, table vs dress vs wearable sculpture. Within these structures, we are made to negotiate labelling bodies and objects. We are asked to think more democratically about what certain things, objects, sculptures, fashions and people are.

This student researched Lucy Orta’s work. Orta blurs boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture, creating ambiguous forms. This student has created a table dress that we cannot easily categorise as one thing or another, table vs dress vs wearable sculpture. Within these structures, we are made to negotiate labelling bodies and objects. We are asked to think more democratically about what certain things, objects, sculptures, fashions and people are.

 This student researched Lucy Orta’s work. Orta blurs boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture, creating ambiguous forms. This student has created a table dress that we cannot easily categorise as one thing or another, table vs dress vs wearable sculpture. Within these structures, we are made to negotiate labelling bodies and objects. We are asked to think more democratically about what certain things, objects, sculptures, fashions and people are.

This student researched Lucy Orta’s work. Orta blurs boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture, creating ambiguous forms. This student has created a table dress that we cannot easily categorise as one thing or another, table vs dress vs wearable sculpture. Within these structures, we are made to negotiate labelling bodies and objects. We are asked to think more democratically about what certain things, objects, sculptures, fashions and people are.

 The students were asked to collect everyday objects that have gendered associations, materially and socially. The students were asked to create ambiguous forms from their everyday object selection by producing shadow drawings. This line of thinking allows students to explore gender/sexuality outside of binaries in an un-representational manner and understand how ambiguity can challenge norms.

The students were asked to collect everyday objects that have gendered associations, materially and socially. The students were asked to create ambiguous forms from their everyday object selection by producing shadow drawings. This line of thinking allows students to explore gender/sexuality outside of binaries in an un-representational manner and understand how ambiguity can challenge norms.

shadow9.jpg
shadow7.jpg
 The students were asked to collect everyday objects that have gendered associations, materially and socially. The students were asked to create ambiguous forms from their everyday object selection by producing shadow drawings. This line of thinking allows students to explore gender/sexuality outside of binaries in an un-representational manner and understand how ambiguity can challenge norms.

The students were asked to collect everyday objects that have gendered associations, materially and socially. The students were asked to create ambiguous forms from their everyday object selection by producing shadow drawings. This line of thinking allows students to explore gender/sexuality outside of binaries in an un-representational manner and understand how ambiguity can challenge norms.

 Using her brother for her art piece, this student explored the different expectations we have for boys and girls and how gender is performative.

Using her brother for her art piece, this student explored the different expectations we have for boys and girls and how gender is performative.

 The students were asked to investigate and self-reflect the gendered/sexual norms that they uphold and repeat daily whilst looking for ways they might fail or resist those norms.

The students were asked to investigate and self-reflect the gendered/sexual norms that they uphold and repeat daily whilst looking for ways they might fail or resist those norms.

 This student researched Lucy Orta’s work, which could be read as capturing ambiguous modes of in-between stages by blurring boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture. This student has created a collar that we cannot accept initially as one thing or another, men’s collar vs ribbon vs adornment vs wearable sculpture.

This student researched Lucy Orta’s work, which could be read as capturing ambiguous modes of in-between stages by blurring boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture. This student has created a collar that we cannot accept initially as one thing or another, men’s collar vs ribbon vs adornment vs wearable sculpture.

 This student researched Lucy Orta’s work, which could be read as capturing ambiguous modes of in-between stages by blurring boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture. This student has created a collar that we cannot accept initially as one thing or another, Men’s collar vs ribbon vs adornment vs wearable sculpture.

This student researched Lucy Orta’s work, which could be read as capturing ambiguous modes of in-between stages by blurring boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture. This student has created a collar that we cannot accept initially as one thing or another, Men’s collar vs ribbon vs adornment vs wearable sculpture.

 The students were asked to investigate and self-reflect the gendered/sexual norms that they uphold and repeat daily whilst looking for ways they might fail or resist those norms.

The students were asked to investigate and self-reflect the gendered/sexual norms that they uphold and repeat daily whilst looking for ways they might fail or resist those norms.

 The students, using the techniques of layering and collage, produced ambiguous/androgynous images that embody failing and resisting gendered norms.

The students, using the techniques of layering and collage, produced ambiguous/androgynous images that embody failing and resisting gendered norms.

 The students, using the techniques of layering and collage, produced ambiguous/androgynous images that embody failing and resisting gendered norms.

The students, using the techniques of layering and collage, produced ambiguous/androgynous images that embody failing and resisting gendered norms.

 The student artwork created from this exploration involved dressing up in different genders.

The student artwork created from this exploration involved dressing up in different genders.

 The student artwork created from this exploration involved dressing up in different genders.

The student artwork created from this exploration involved dressing up in different genders.

 The students were presented with non-representational artwork and asked to read gender and sexuality into the work. This allowed the students to explore gender and sexuality outside of recognisable images and depictions. From here, students brought in objects that they associated certain genders/sexualities with, and produced shadow drawings from the objects to create ambiguous forms. These forms then laid the foundation of their sculptural work.
 This student wanted to experiment with space, creating a large sculpture that extended beyond the confines of the classroom. Here, we are asked to read a queer space in the school.
hangingb.jpg
Closeup.jpg
 The students were presented with non-representational artwork and asked to read gender and sexuality into the work. This allowed the students to explore gender and sexuality outside of recognisable images and depictions. From here, students brought in objects that they associated to certain genders/sexualities, and produced shadow drawings from the objects to create ambiguous forms. These forms then laid the foundation of their sculptural work.
gallery.jpg
 This student wanted to experiment with space, creating a large sculpture that extended beyond the confines of the classroom. Here, we are asked to read a queer space in the school.
 This student researched Lucy Orta’s work. Orta blurs boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture, creating ambiguous forms. This student has created a table dress that we cannot easily categorise as one thing or another, table vs dress vs wearable sculpture. Within these structures, we are made to negotiate labelling bodies and objects. We are asked to think more democratically about what certain things, objects, sculptures, fashions and people are.
 This student researched Lucy Orta’s work. Orta blurs boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture, creating ambiguous forms. This student has created a table dress that we cannot easily categorise as one thing or another, table vs dress vs wearable sculpture. Within these structures, we are made to negotiate labelling bodies and objects. We are asked to think more democratically about what certain things, objects, sculptures, fashions and people are.
 The students were asked to collect everyday objects that have gendered associations, materially and socially. The students were asked to create ambiguous forms from their everyday object selection by producing shadow drawings. This line of thinking allows students to explore gender/sexuality outside of binaries in an un-representational manner and understand how ambiguity can challenge norms.
shadow9.jpg
shadow7.jpg
 The students were asked to collect everyday objects that have gendered associations, materially and socially. The students were asked to create ambiguous forms from their everyday object selection by producing shadow drawings. This line of thinking allows students to explore gender/sexuality outside of binaries in an un-representational manner and understand how ambiguity can challenge norms.
 Using her brother for her art piece, this student explored the different expectations we have for boys and girls and how gender is performative.
 The students were asked to investigate and self-reflect the gendered/sexual norms that they uphold and repeat daily whilst looking for ways they might fail or resist those norms.
 This student researched Lucy Orta’s work, which could be read as capturing ambiguous modes of in-between stages by blurring boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture. This student has created a collar that we cannot accept initially as one thing or another, men’s collar vs ribbon vs adornment vs wearable sculpture.
 This student researched Lucy Orta’s work, which could be read as capturing ambiguous modes of in-between stages by blurring boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture. This student has created a collar that we cannot accept initially as one thing or another, Men’s collar vs ribbon vs adornment vs wearable sculpture.
 The students were asked to investigate and self-reflect the gendered/sexual norms that they uphold and repeat daily whilst looking for ways they might fail or resist those norms.
 The students, using the techniques of layering and collage, produced ambiguous/androgynous images that embody failing and resisting gendered norms.
 The students, using the techniques of layering and collage, produced ambiguous/androgynous images that embody failing and resisting gendered norms.
 The student artwork created from this exploration involved dressing up in different genders.
 The student artwork created from this exploration involved dressing up in different genders.

The students were presented with non-representational artwork and asked to read gender and sexuality into the work. This allowed the students to explore gender and sexuality outside of recognisable images and depictions. From here, students brought in objects that they associated certain genders/sexualities with, and produced shadow drawings from the objects to create ambiguous forms. These forms then laid the foundation of their sculptural work.

This student wanted to experiment with space, creating a large sculpture that extended beyond the confines of the classroom. Here, we are asked to read a queer space in the school.

The students were presented with non-representational artwork and asked to read gender and sexuality into the work. This allowed the students to explore gender and sexuality outside of recognisable images and depictions. From here, students brought in objects that they associated to certain genders/sexualities, and produced shadow drawings from the objects to create ambiguous forms. These forms then laid the foundation of their sculptural work.

This student wanted to experiment with space, creating a large sculpture that extended beyond the confines of the classroom. Here, we are asked to read a queer space in the school.

This student researched Lucy Orta’s work. Orta blurs boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture, creating ambiguous forms. This student has created a table dress that we cannot easily categorise as one thing or another, table vs dress vs wearable sculpture. Within these structures, we are made to negotiate labelling bodies and objects. We are asked to think more democratically about what certain things, objects, sculptures, fashions and people are.

This student researched Lucy Orta’s work. Orta blurs boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture, creating ambiguous forms. This student has created a table dress that we cannot easily categorise as one thing or another, table vs dress vs wearable sculpture. Within these structures, we are made to negotiate labelling bodies and objects. We are asked to think more democratically about what certain things, objects, sculptures, fashions and people are.

The students were asked to collect everyday objects that have gendered associations, materially and socially. The students were asked to create ambiguous forms from their everyday object selection by producing shadow drawings. This line of thinking allows students to explore gender/sexuality outside of binaries in an un-representational manner and understand how ambiguity can challenge norms.

The students were asked to collect everyday objects that have gendered associations, materially and socially. The students were asked to create ambiguous forms from their everyday object selection by producing shadow drawings. This line of thinking allows students to explore gender/sexuality outside of binaries in an un-representational manner and understand how ambiguity can challenge norms.

Using her brother for her art piece, this student explored the different expectations we have for boys and girls and how gender is performative.

The students were asked to investigate and self-reflect the gendered/sexual norms that they uphold and repeat daily whilst looking for ways they might fail or resist those norms.

This student researched Lucy Orta’s work, which could be read as capturing ambiguous modes of in-between stages by blurring boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture. This student has created a collar that we cannot accept initially as one thing or another, men’s collar vs ribbon vs adornment vs wearable sculpture.

This student researched Lucy Orta’s work, which could be read as capturing ambiguous modes of in-between stages by blurring boundaries of architecture, fashion and sculpture. This student has created a collar that we cannot accept initially as one thing or another, Men’s collar vs ribbon vs adornment vs wearable sculpture.

The students were asked to investigate and self-reflect the gendered/sexual norms that they uphold and repeat daily whilst looking for ways they might fail or resist those norms.

The students, using the techniques of layering and collage, produced ambiguous/androgynous images that embody failing and resisting gendered norms.

The students, using the techniques of layering and collage, produced ambiguous/androgynous images that embody failing and resisting gendered norms.

The student artwork created from this exploration involved dressing up in different genders.

The student artwork created from this exploration involved dressing up in different genders.

show thumbnails